On the lighter side of life – Did you know? 10 amazing pieces of air travel trivia

We keeping hearing how air travel will look fundamentally different in the future and 2020 will be remembered as a milestone moment in the industry’s evolution – but, not for positive reasons. This week we thought we would look bad and remember that industry that holds so many memories for travellers. Here’s some interesting travel facts we discovered on the Internet. How many are still true and how many need to be branded ‘BC’, or ‘before covid’? Look out for more facts next week!

The USD$40,000 saving

In 1987 American Airlines saved USD40,000 by removing one olive from each salad served in first class.

The obese SuperJumbo

The wing-span of the A380 is longer than the aircraft itself. Wingspan is 80 metres and the length 72.7 metres.

The USD700 million foodbill

BC – Singapore Airlines spent approximately USD700 million on food every year and USD16 million on wine

1.5 litres of water

Travelling by air can shed up to 1.5 litres of water from the body during an average three-hour flight.

A short flight

The Boeing 747 wingspan is longer than the Wright Brothers first flight of 120ft.

The world’s tallest man

The winglets on an Airbus A330-200 are the same height as the world’s tallest man.

Digital transformation

BC – By American Airlines switching a pilots paper manuals to iPad they will save over USD1 million in fuel.

Black boxes aren’t actually black

The black box, also known as the Flight Data Recorder, is actually painted bright orange. The heat-resistant paint used to coat the boxes’ exteriors comes in a highlighter-orange hue, which also happens to make them easier to find in case of an accident.

The dirtiest place on the plane isn’t the bathroom

As it so happens, the filthiest place on a plane is that tray table you’re eating your meal off. According to a study conducted by TravelMath, tray tables hosted 2,155 colony-forming bacterial units (CFU) per square inch. In comparison, the button to flush the toilet had just 265 CFU in the same amount of space.

A hijacker once relinquished control of a flight for beer

In 1985, an ex-convict who hijacked a Norwegian Boeing 737 armed with a pistol decided to abandon his plan so long as the police were willing to give him one thing: beer. In the end, the plane landed safely at Fornebu Airport in Oslo, none of the 115 passengers on board were harmed, and the hijacker was arrested.

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